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New drought initiative to feed and encourage

New drought initiative to feed and encourage

If you’re concerned about farmers who are struggling to put food on the family table and to feed their animals, Orange City Life is giving you the opportunity to do something practical and neighbourly about it.

We’re giving you the chance to feed and encourage people in this position, through an initiative we’re calling Food for Life.

There’s three ways you can get involved –

Option 1 (for individuals)

Make a straight out cash donation to “Food for Life”.

How to do this:

Simply call our office on 6361 3575 to make a donation using your credit card or to arrange an electronic transfer, or call into our office at Suite 3/241 Lords Place to make a donation. Receipts will be issued for all donations.

Option 2 (for businesses)

Donate $275 to Food for Life and we’ll give you a quarter page ad in Orange City Life as a Thank you!

How to do this:

Simply call our office on 6361 3575, or all into Suite 3/241 Lords Place to make the necessary arrangements.

Options 3 (for everyone)

Help us to get the food or fodder to where it’s most needed. Tell us the name of a farming family you know who needs help.

How to do this:

Simply phone or email our office with the name and details of the family you know and tell us what is most urgently needed – food for the table or fodder for the animals.

What we’ll do –

We’ll purchase food or fodder according to your requests and have it delivered directly and personally to the families our readers suggest.

Our goals with Food for Life are:

1. To help farmers who need it with practical help.

2. To encourage those farmers battling the drought by letting them know they are not alone and people do care and want to help.

OCL’s Food for Life is supported by Mullion Produce, Furney’s Stock Feeds and Ashcroft’s Supa IGA.

Our student performers continue to shine

Our student performers continue to shine

Peter calls a halt after 36 years

Peter calls a halt after 36 years